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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Nurses attitudes towards computerisation. found in the catalog.

Nurses attitudes towards computerisation.

Sandra Burnett

Nurses attitudes towards computerisation.

by Sandra Burnett

  • 187 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

ContributionsManchester Metropolitan University. Department of Health Care Studies.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16721170M

studies analysing nurses’ attitudes towards computer use in Turkey are limited.1,3 This descriptive and cross-sectional study aimed to address nurses’ computer literacy and attitudes towards the use of computers in health care and to determine the . Abstract. School of Nursing Studies, University of Wales College ofMedtane, Heath Park, Cardiff Accepted for publication 10 September SULTANA N () Jottmal of Advanced Nurs Nurses' attitudes towards computerization in clinical practice This descnphve research project was designed to replicate the study of Brodt & Stronge () and to extend and investigate the attitudes.

Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library. Before moving to the adverse effects of a bad attitude at the workplace, let us look at a few features of effective teams. As per J Richard Hackman, in his book Leading Teams, “Effective teams are the ones which deliver results that are more than expected by the client.” Working process leads the team to become a cohesive group in the long.

Sultana reported that nurses attitudes towards computers in clinical settings are more unfavourable than favourable. Yet, a more recent study in a British general hospital found that nurses’ computer related attitudes were generally positive. or the possibility that enthusiastic staff members were able to book training first, may mean. NURSE ATTITUDES TOWARD CARING FOR OLDER PATIENTS WITH DELIRIUM Delirium, which is prevalent among older hospitalized patients, is a disease that may be prevented or reversed with appropriate care. However, the consequences of not adequately treating delirium in a growing older population can be enormously costly to patients, families.


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Nurses attitudes towards computerisation by Sandra Burnett Download PDF EPUB FB2

Concerning the attitudes of nurses towards computerisation, the literature is almost equally divided between those which found nurses to have positive attitudes and those which found them to have negative attitudes. A number of published studies have focused on the attitudes of nurses toward computerisation [11,12].

Most of these researches Cited by: Nurses attitudes towards computerisation Concerning the attitudes of nurses towards computerisa-tion, the literature is almost equally divided between those which found nurses to have positive attitudes and those which found them to have negative attitudes.

A number of published studies have focused on the attitudes of nurses toward Cited by: Generally, nurses have positive attitudes towards information is important for the planning and implementation of computerisation in the hospital as. Data was collected using the modified Nurses' Attitudes Towards Computerisation (NATC) questionnaire.

Nurses had a favorable attitude towards computerisation. Non-users had a significantly higher. Introduction: Attitudes of nursing students towards learning nurse-patient communication skills have for Nurses attitudes towards computerisation.

book been a concern of lecturers, planners and policy-makers. The objectives of our study were to explore the attitudes of nursing students towards learning communication : Klavdija Čuček Trifkovič, Mateja Lorber, Margaret Denny, SuzanneDenieffe, Vida Gönc. DOI: / Corpus ID: Attitudes of nursing staff towards computerisation: a case of two hospitals in Nairobi, Kenya @article{KipturgoAttitudesON, title={Attitudes of nursing staff towards computerisation: a case of two hospitals in Nairobi, Kenya}, author={Mathew K.

Kipturgo and Lucy W Kivuti-Bitok and Ann K. Karani and Margaret. that hospitals examine the attitudes of their nurses toward computerisation. nurses at a Perth teaching hospical responded to a questionnaire, incorporating a tool designed by Strange and Brodt (), re.,orted to be both reliable and valia, that measured their attitude toward computerisation.

The study revealed that the overall attitude. This article enables the reader to examine attitudes and their constituent beliefs and values. It explores the function of attitudes, considers how they are formed and reflects on the process of attitude change, examining how persuasion can be used to enable individuals to revisit behaviours that seem problematic or less effective.

Nursing. A study to determine the attitudes of Registered Nurses towards the use of computers in the hospital setting as a predictor of their future behavior based on the theory of Planned Behavior with nine different indices namely, behavioural intention towards computer use, general attitudes toward computer use, nursing attitudes toward computer use.

The values are necessary for nurses to integrate caring behaviors towards their patients and to all members of the healthcare team. Even with a shared set of values and behaviors, we cannot underestimate the nurse’s attitude towards: others, their patients, their co-workers, and the organization they work for and towards the profession of.

Effectively, the attitudes of nurses towards computerisation will determine the success or failure of the program being introduced. Other studies on the attitudes of nurses toward computerisation have detailed a variety of findings [16, 17, 18, 19].

Nurses had a favorable attitude towards computerisation. Non-users had a significantly higher attitude score compared to the users (p = ).

Statistically significant associations were observed with age (p = ), level of education (p = ), duration of exposure to computers (p = ) and attitudes towards computerisation.

A stratified, random sampling of nurses working in a Hong Kong private hospital and using Hospital Information System was recruited.

A questionnaire was used to collect data on perceptions, level of satisfaction and attitudes towards Hospital Information System usage. Correlations and linear regressions were used to analyse the data. Results. These values further provide a framework for evaluating nurses’ beliefs and attitudes.

Fry, Veatch & Taylor () suggest that values are the desirable rational conceptions, and standards that guide behavior. By adhering to this set of values, nurses have developed a caring attitude towards their patients and families.

In a survey of the attitudes of qualified nurses towards computers, educational prepar- ation, length of service in the nursing profession and type of nursing unit were found to influence nurses' attitudes towards computerisation (Brodt & Stronge ).

implementation. Early studies evaluated nurses’ attitudes toward computers in relation to years of education and years of nursing. Results revealed nurses with more education had more favorable attitudes toward computers. Nurses who had worked longer also had a more favorable attitude toward computers (Brodt & Stronge, ).

An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among nurses and 53 physicians working in Felegehiwot and Gondar University Referral Hospitals. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires. Attitudes of nurses and physicians were measured using Jefferson scale of attitudes towards nurse-physician Collaboration.

The crucial involvement of nurses in the planning, development, and introduction of INIS will be highlighted. As a result of nurse involvement in the overall Information Technology (IT) Programme of the hospital, positive attitudes of nurses towards the computerisation of nursing documentation was evident in a recent study conducted in 2.

Therefore in order to gain maximum benefit from an EIS, it has been strongly suggested that hospitals examine the attitudes of their nurses toward computerisation. nurses at a Perth teaching hospital responded to a questionnaire, incorporating a tool designed by Strange and Brodt (), reported to be both reliable and valid, that measured.

Understanding nurses’ attitudes toward healthcare technology may help drive acceptance, as well as maximize the inherent potential of the new technologies toward improving patient care.

Thus, the purpose of this integrative review is to highlight what is known about nurses’ attitudes toward meaningful use technologies. Dekkers, Leget, et al., ). Nurses working on the day shift, and nurses having 17–21 years of experience reported more favorable attitudes toward caring for dying patients than younger nurses, nurses on afternoon and night shifts, and nurses with less experience (Román, Sorribes, & Ezquerro, ).

Nurses as well as other.Almost all (98%) of the respondents worked in a computerized general practice and all reported having a positive attitude towards the clinical and administrative use of computers. Some 84% of practice nurses had a computer terminal where they saw patients and over 70% used the computer to gain access to clinical information.With an aim of this the investigators undertook the study to assess the attitude of the Staff Nurses towards computer application in nursing practice by a standardized scale called P.A.T.C.H.

Scale (Pretest for Attitudes Towards Computers in Healthcare).